Recently, the Oregon Board of Pharmacy adopted a new rule for wholesale distributors, requiring that they report suspicious orders to the Board for review. The rule goes into effect on July 1, 2017.

The adoption of the new rule followed several recent settlements by wholesale distributors around the country, who are facing severe penalties for failing to report suspicious orders of controlled substances to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).
Continue Reading Oregon Adds Suspicious Order Reporting to Wholesale Distributor Requirements

An Oklahoma doctor wrote 19 Schedule II controlled substance prescriptions for a patient with low back pain over eight months without thoroughly documenting the patient’s history, confronting the patient over aberrant drug tests, or talking to other doctors who were prescribing the patient controlled substances. The Chief Administrative Law Judge felt the doctor should be granted a new registration, but placed on probation for one year. Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg disagreed. He reviewed the case and concluded that DEA proved that the doctor knew the patient was abusing or diverting the drugs and prescribed anyway.  Dr. Wesley Pope’s application for a new DEA registration was denied as inconsistent with the public interest.
Continue Reading DEA Decisions: In the Matter of Wesley Pope, M.D.

The Washington Post reported last week that it obtained sealed court documents describing how National Football League teams have violated federal prescription drug laws regarding the storage, tracking, transportation, and distribution of controlled substances. The documents—prepared by lawyers representing more than 1,800 former professional football players—include testimony and records that implicate all 32 NFL teams and a number of league personnel.

Plaintiffs filed Evans v. Arizona Cardinals Football Club, LLC in the U.S. District Court of Northern California in May 2015, after a federal judge dismissed a similar claim filed in state court (Dent v. Natl. Football League) on preemption grounds. Although the basis of the claims have long been public knowledge, the sealed documents cited in the article have renewed public interest by painting a detailed picture of alleged improper dispensing and overprescribing.


Continue Reading Washington Post Article Highlights Alleged Improper Drug Practices By NFL Teams

a rural mailbox chocked full of mail

We recently reported that the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was changing its longstanding policy of allowing for a grace period for registrants who file an untimely application for renewal. This notice was posted on the homepage of DEA’s Office of Diversion Control’s website.

A Revised Announcement Regarding Renewal Applications is now posted on DEA’s website indicating that, except for one minor change, DEA is retaining its current policy and procedures regarding registration renewals. The announcement now reads:

Starting January 2017, DEA will no longer send its second renewal notification by mail. Instead, an electronic reminder to renew will be sent to the email address associated with the DEA registration.
Continue Reading DEA Reverses Decision to Change Registration Policy

reminder round orange grungy vintage isolated stamp

DEA recently announced a significant change to its registration renewal process.

For several years, DEA’s registration unit has allowed for a grace period for registrants who file an untimely application for renewal.  While DEA’s regulations do not contemplate such a grace period, registrants, especially individual practitioners, were allowed to keep their existing registration number — which was considered valid and active during the grace period — despite the failure to file a timely renewal application and despite multiple notifications from DEA.
Continue Reading DEA Changes Longstanding Registration Policy

Pills production Line

On May 11, 2016, the Drug Enforcement Administration filed its brief in Masters Pharmaceutical, Inc. v. Drug Enforcement Administration (Docket No: 15-1335), in the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. The vast majority of the Government’s brief addresses whether “substantial evidence” (the applicable standard of review) supports Acting Administrator Rosenberg’s decision to revoke Masters’ DEA registration. Curiously, the Government does not dedicate much effort to one of the seminal issues in the case: whether DEA imposed new obligations on registrants in violation of the Administrative Procedure Act.

Rather than attempt to defend the indefensible, the Government invoked a creative reading of the Masters Final Order that is starkly at odds with Administrator Rosenberg’s decision. In its brief, DEA states that Administrator Rosenberg’s decision “did not impose any new duties on distributors.” In defending this position, the Government’s brief goes on to say the following:

Most of the “new duties” that Masters and amici cite in their briefs were obligations that Masters had voluntarily imposed on itself through its own compliance program. [citation omitted] The Administrator cited Masters’ failure to perform many of these duties – such as obtaining utilization reports or asking customers for explanations of unusually large orders – because Masters sought to rely on its compliance program to justify its reporting failures. However, in highlighting Masters’ disregard for its own program’s requirements, the Administrator did not impose those same requirements on all registered distributors.


Continue Reading The Continued Evolution of DEA’s Due Diligence Requirements

The Chronicles welcomes guest blogger Katea Ravega, a Q&B Health Law attorney.

In a 308-page decision dated September 8, 2015, the new Acting Administrator of the DEA, Chuck Rosenberg, issued an Order revoking the DEA registration of wholesale distributor Masters Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Masters”). In doing so, the Administrator rejected the recommendation from DEA’s

On July 27, 2015, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report titled, Prescription Drugs: More DEA Information about Registrants’ Controlled Substances Roles Could Improve Their Understanding and Help Ensure Access.  GAO’s report examined, (1) to what extent registrants interact with DEA about their CSA responsibilities, and registrants’ perspectives on those interactions, (2) how state

DEA-HandcuffsOn May 20, 2015, DEA issued a press release regarding a recent major enforcement action in Arkansas, Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Operation Pilluted targeted alleged pill mills that were engaged in the illegal distribution of oxycodone, hydrocodone and Xanax. The operation resulted in the arrest of 280 individuals, including 22 doctors and pharmacists. Executing 21

On February 12, 2015, Senators Hatch and Whitehouse introduced the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2015.  This is the companion bill to H.R. 471, sponsored by Representatives Marino, Blackburn, Welch, and Chu that was recently approved by the Subcommittee on Health, Energy and Commerce Committee. At a recent Congressional