The Department of Justice recently published its list of proposed regulatory actions for the near and long term.  It appears that the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA’s) Regulatory Drafting and Support Section is going to have a busy year.  The Unified Agenda indicates several potential regulatory changes are in store for the coming year, some of which may have significant impact on the regulated community.

A few highlights:

  • Updates to the suspicious order regulation have been delayed to at least February 2019.
  • DEA will provide guidance for Emergency Medical Services wishing to handle controlled substances.
  • After more than nine years, DEA is finally implementing regulations regarding the practice of telemedicine, as required by Congress in the Ryan Haight Act.
  • Guidance is forthcoming regarding the partial filling of prescriptions for Schedule II controlled substances as a result of related provisions in the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) of 2016.
  • It appears that additional (and significant changes) will be coming to DEA’s quota process.
  • DEA is getting rid of the carbon copy 222 form! (for those too young to understand the concept of carbon copies, click here)

Below are links to each notification and a summary taken directly from the related Abstract.

Stay tuned. We will provide updates as they become available.


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Over a period of two weeks in June, the House passed several bills aimed at combating the ongoing opioid epidemic. Our summary of the earlier measures can be found here. Key points of these additional legislative initiatives are summarized below. We will continue to monitor and report on their progress.

R. 3192, CHIP Mental Health Parity Act
This bill required state Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP programs) to cover mental health benefits including substance use disorder services for pregnant women and children. It also prohibits states from imposing financial or utilization limits on mental health treatment that are lower than the limits placed on physical health treatment.

R. 3331
Specifically, this bill encourages the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to test models to provide incentive payments to behavioral health providers for adopting electronic health records technology, and using that technology to improve the quality and coordination of care.


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On Tuesday, the House of Representatives passed a fleet of bills aimed at combating the ongoing opioid crisis, most aimed at developing preventative measures to curb opioid addiction by funding research. The measures passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. Key points of these legislative initiatives are summarized below. Quarles & Brady will continue to monitor their progress.

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As the national discussion on opioid abuse continues, state governments are looking to their tax laws as a way of “addressing” the issue. The Kentucky House recently approved a 25 cent per pill tax for every dose sent into the state. The measure now moves to the Kentucky Senate. The state expects to raise $70 million a year from the tax. Kentucky does not, however, intend to use the funds for opioid addiction treatment, but plans to use the tax revenue for unrelated budget needs.
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On December 12, 2017, the Senate Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing to discuss the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act (the “Act”). The Act has been the subject of recent sensationalized news reports which included interviews with a purported DEA whistleblower and other former DEA employees.
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Nobody would argue with the fact that there is an opioid crisis in our country – it is a demonstrable fact. However, there has recently been a significant focus on whether drug wholesalers and their business partners including lobbyists have caused people to die from overdoses, including a recent segment by 60 Minutes. While the segment sought to educate viewers on the causes of prescription drug abuse and the alleged slowdown in enforcement efforts by the government, it is of course journalism and takes a strong position against drug companies. Aided by reporters from the Washington Post and former employees from the Drug Enforcement Administration (“DEA”), the 60 Minutes segment, while dramatic in its presentation, only told the facts relevant to the position it was taking – which is what makes good headlines.
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On November 16, 2015, the House of Representatives agreed to the Senate’s amended version of the Improving Regulatory Transparency for New Medical Therapies Act (H.R. 639). We previously described how the version of H.R. 639 originally passed by the House gave manufacturers clarity and security on the timing of DEA actions related to the entrance of new drugs into the market. The Senate’s amendment maintains these provisions and then sweetens the deal, with one exception.

What’s New:  H.R. 639 allows for re-exportation among EEA countries without prior approval by DEA

Now, H.R. 639 incorporates the provisions of H.R. 2340, another bill introduced this session by Congressman Pitts. These provisions amend the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act to remove regulatory barriers to the re-exportation of controlled substances among members of the European Economic Area (the free trade zone uniting the EU member states and Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway) (“EEA”). The Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”) and DEA regulations currently impose conditions under which a drug in Schedule I or II or a narcotic drug in Schedule III or IV may be exported to a “first country” and then re-exported to one or more than one “second country.” If H.R. 639 becomes law, re-exportation within the EEA would change in the following ways:
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cap1As we previously reported, on February 12, 2015, Senators Hatch and Whitehouse introduced the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2015.  Also on that date, the Senators introduced legislation that would also amend the Controlled Substances Act, as well as the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.  This legislation addresses, among other things,

On February 12, 2015, Senators Hatch and Whitehouse introduced the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2015.  This is the companion bill to H.R. 471, sponsored by Representatives Marino, Blackburn, Welch, and Chu that was recently approved by the Subcommittee on Health, Energy and Commerce Committee. At a recent Congressional